Common Class Training for Dogs

Basic Manners

Basic manners classes are great for dogs eight months and older who have never had any training or need a refresher. We will focus on a few specific behaviors, and spend some time working through them and building better alternative behaviors.  These classes will also provide your dogs with proper socialization skills to get them ready for a long, happy life with great manners.  Our pet manners classes are a great foundation for all of our sports classes and advanced obedience classes.

Are you a serious competitor needing a top-quality trainer and space to practice? Do you just want to have some fun with your pooch? Then DFW Dog Quest is right for you! Our first-class facility and dog training staff lets your pet excel in the activity or sport of your choice.

Puppy Manners

These classes are a must for any puppy 12 weeks to 8 months old. We will help your puppy with proper socialization techniques, while building a bond between you and your new pup! We’ll introduce your dog to basic commands and get them ready for a long, happy life with great manners. Our puppy classes are a great foundation for all of our sports classes and advanced obedience classes.

Are you a serious competitor needing a top-quality trainer and space to practice? Do you just want to have some fun with your pooch? Then DFW Dog Quest is right for you! Our first-class facility and dog training staff lets your pet excel in the activity or sport of your choice.

DFW Dog Quest is the only premier dog training facility west of I-35 in the DFW Metroplex. We’re easily accessible from all major roadways in the Lewisville, Flower Mound, Highland Village, Coppell, Carrollton, Grapevine and Southlake areas.

Competitive Obedience

For dog owners who enjoy competition and want to work as a highly tuned team with their dogs, Competitive Obedience trials are a great option.

In competition, the dog and handler must perform certain activities off-leash and in a highly stylized and carefully defined manner. For example, on a recall, the dog must come directly to the handler, without sniffing or veering to one side, and must sit straight in front of the handler, not at an angle or off to one side. Training for Obedience competitions builds on basic obedience training.

Obedience titles include: Companion Dog (CD), Companion Dog Excellent (CDX), Utility Dog (UD), Utility Dog Excellent (UDX), and Obedience Trial Champion (OTCH).

In recent years, a new form of obedience competition known as Rally Obedience has become very popular. Rally Obedience is designed to be an intermediate step between the Canine Good Citizen certification and traditional Obedience competition. Click here for more information about Rally Obedience.

Rally Obedience

Rally Obedience (also known as Rally or Rally-O) is a dog sport based on obedience. Instead of waiting for the judge’s orders as in regular obedience, the competitors proceed around a course of designated stations with the dog in heel position, and handlers are allowed to encourage their dogs during the course. The course consists of 10 to 20 signs that instruct the team what to do.

The team starts with 100 points, and the judge deducts points for mistakes. After qualifying three times under two different judges, the dog earns a title, which appears after the dog’s registered name. Each qualifying trial earned is known as a “leg.”

There are three levels in Rally:

  • Novice, the beginner’s class. The dog is on leash and there are 10 to 15 stations. The title earned is RN.
  • Advanced, for dogs who have completed their Novice title. Dogs are judged off-leash, and the title is RA.
  • Excellent, the highest class, for dogs who have earned their Advanced title. There are 15 to 20 stations, including two jumps, and the title is RE.
  • Additionally, there is the Rally Advanced Excellent (RAE) title, in which the team has to qualify in both Advanced and Excellent in 10 trials.

Circus Dog

Circus Dog are fun tricks classes perfect for that pooch who dreams of being a star or the life of the party! Learn behaviors like rolling a ball, rolling out a carpet, jumps, wave, bow, and more. This class will prepare those interested in obtaining Trick Dog titles through “Do More With Your Dog!®.” Do More With Your Dog!® is the only official sanctioning and organizing body for the sport of Dog Tricks.

Handlers and dogs will learn nose/paw targeting, rolling ball and carpet, wave, bow, hoola hoop jumps, leg weaves, and spins. As the handler/dog team continues to expand on their skills, they will learn more complex tricks such as roll over, pray, crawl, beg, be shy, double hoop jump, and shell game.

At the end of Circus Dog 1, your dog can perform what he’s learned to satisfy the requirements witnessed for a Novice Trick Dog title through Do More With Your Dog!®, and upon completion of Circus Dog 2, your dog will be ready to satisfy the requirements witnessed for an Intermediate Trick Dog title through Do More With Your Dog!®. Title fees are $20 upon submission of paperwork to, and payable to, Do More With Your Dog!®.

Are you a serious competitor needing a top-quality trainer and space to practice? Do you just want to have some fun with your pooch? Then DFW Dog Quest is right for you! Our first-class facility and dog training staff lets your pet excel in the activity or sport of your choice.

DFW Dog Quest is the only premier dog training facility west of I-35 in the DFW Metroplex. We’re easily accessible from all major roadways in the Lewisville, Flower Mound, Highland Village, Coppell, Carrollton, Grapevine and Southlake areas.

Flyball

Flyball is a fun, non-hunting relay sport for any size or breed of dog. One at a time, a team of four dogs race down a track with hurdles, release a ball from a spring-loaded box, and return with the ball to the start line before the next dog is released. It’s a great way for high-energy dogs to burn off some steam!

The course consists of four hurdles placed 10 feet apart for a total 51-foot length. The hurdle height is determined by the shoulder height of the smallest dog on the team, referred to as the height dog.

Each dog must return its ball all the way across the start line before the next dog begins. The first team to have all four dogs cross the finish line error-free wins the heat. Penalties are applied if the ball is dropped or if the next relay dog is released early.

Flyball is popular because it’s open to mixed-breed dogs, and there is no size limitation for the animals. The only requirement is whether they can trigger the release pad, and small dogs often have to fully jump on it to do so.

Many pet owners use Flyball as a way to relax and socialize with other dog owners, and lots of champion Flyball dogs are essentially pets with a hobby, rather than dedicated sporting or working animals. On the other hand, modern Flyball has become the fastest-growing team sport for dogs, handlers and coaches. Some teams use trained handlers and dedicated, special-bred sport dogs who are coached to perform.

Flyball can be a real sport for dedicated performers, and a fun hobby for all!